VM Inception | Nested Virtualization in Azure

I bet that most of you have watched the movie “Inception”, where a group of people are building a dream within a dream within a dream. Before Windows Server 2016 you couldn’t deploy a VM within a VM in Hyper-V. Lot of people are/were encouraged to use VMware as it supported this capability called “Nested Virtualization”. But with the release of Windows Server 2016 & Hyper-V server 2016 this functionality has been introduced. This is specially useful when you don’t have lot of hardware to run your lab environments or want to deploy a PoC system without burning thousands of dollars.

Microsoft announced the support for nested virtualization Azure IaaS VMs using the newly announced  Dv3 and Ev3 VM sizes. This capability allows you to create nested VMs in an Azure VM and also run Hyper-V containers in Azure by using nested VM hosts. Now let’s have look on how this is implemented in Azure Azure Compute fabric.

Image Courtesy Build 2017

As you can see in the above diagram, on top of the Azure hardware layer, Microsoft has deployed the Windows Server 2016 Hyper-V hypervisor. Microsoft then adds vCPU on top of that to expose the Azure IaaS VMs that you would normally get. With nested virtualization, you can enable Hyper-V inside those Azure IaaS VMs running Windows Server 2016. You can then run any number of  Hyper-V 2016 supported guest operating systems inside these nested VM hosts.

Following references from MSFT provides more information on how you can get started with nested virtualization in Azure.