Storage Spaces Direct | Deploying S2D in Azure

This post explores how to build a Storage Space Direct lab in Azure. Bear in mind that S2D in Azure is not a supported scenario for production workloads as of yet.

Following are the high level steps that needs to be followed in order to create provision a S2D lab in Azure. For this lab, I’m using DS1 V2 VMs with Windows Server 2016 Datacenter edition for all the roles and two P20 512 GB Premium SSD disks in each storage node.

Create a VNET

In my Azure tenant I have created a VNET called s2d-vnet with 10.0.0.0/24 address space with a single subnet as below.

1-s2d-create-vnet

Create a Domain Controller

I have deployed a domain controller called jcb-dc in a new windows active directory jcb.com with DNS role installed. Once DNS role has been installed, I have changed the DNS server IP address in the s2d-vnet to my domain controller’s IP address. You may wonder what is the second DNS IP address. It is actually the default Azure DNS IP address added as a redundant DNS server in case if we lose connectivity to the domain controller. This will provide Internet name resolution to the VMs in case domain controller is no longer functional.

1-s2d-vnet-dns

Create the Cluster Nodes

Here I have deployed 3 Windows Server VMs jcb-node1, jcb-node2 and jcb-node3 and joined them to the jcb.com domain. All 3 nodes are deployed in a single availability set.

Configure Failover Clustering

Now we have to configure the Failover Cluster. I’m installing the Failover Clustering role in all 3 nodes using below PowerShell snippet.

$nodes = (“jcb-node01”, “jcb-node02”, “jcb-node03”)

icm $nodes {Install-WindowsFeature Failover-Clustering -IncludeAllSubFeature -IncludeManagementTools}

3-s2d-install-fc

Then I’m going to create the Failover Cluster by executing below snippet in any of the three nodes. This will create a Failover Cluster called JCB-CLU.

$nodes = (“jcb-node01”, “jcb-node02”, “jcb-node03”)

New-Cluster -Name JCB-CLU -Node $nodes –StaticAddress 10.0.0.10

4-s2d-create-fc

Deploying S2D

When I execute Enable-ClusterS2D cmdlet, it will enable Storage Paces Direct and start creating a storage pool automatically as below.

5-s2d-enable-1

5-s2d-enable-2

12-s2d-csv

You can see that the storage pool has been created.

7-s2d-pool-fcm

8-s2d-pool

Creating a Volume

Now we can create a volume in our new S2D setup.

New-Volume -StoragePoolFriendlyName S2D* -FriendlyName JCBVDisk01 -FileSystem CSVFS_REFS -Size 800GB

9-s2d-create-volume

Implementing Scale-out File Server Role

Now we can proceed with SOFS role installation followed by adding SOFS cluster role.

icm $nodes {Install-WindowsFeature FS-FileServer}

Add-ClusterScaleOutFileServerRole -Name jcb-sofs

10-s2d-sofs-install

11-s2d-sofs-enable

Finally I have created an SMB share called Janaka in the newly created CSV.
13-s2d-smb-share

Automating S2D Deployment in Azure with ARM Templates

If you want to automate the entire deployment of the S2D lab you can use below ARM template by Keith Mayer which will create a 2-node S2D Cluster.

Create a Storage Spaces Direct (S2D) Scale-Out File Server (SOFS) Cluster with Windows Server 2016 on an existing VNET

This template requires you to have active VNET and a domain controller deployed first which you can automate using below ARM template. 

Create a 2 new Windows VMs, create a new AD Forest, Domain and 2 DCs in an availability set

We will discuss how to use DISKSPD & VMFLET to perform load and stress testing in a S2D deployment in our next post.